Peanut Butter Principles

Peanut Butter Principles – 47 Leadership Lessons Every Parent Should Teach Their Kids

From an early age I’ve taught my kids that they are unique, special and they each have their own gifts and talents to share. I believe that it is very important for parents to teach their children how to love themselves before they can love and give of themselves to others.

20150220_065245My five children are very different from each other. My oldest is creative and enjoys writing.  She is also very strong on her faith and teaches me new things about the Saints and how to grow in my spiritual life every day.  For a while she thought about joining a convent but now her heart is set on traveling the world and writing.

Girl Guitar

My next born, another girl, is my mini me.  She is also very creative and smart and has a gift for music, entertaining others and making them laugh.  She plays the guitar, clarinet and sings.

Child AquariumTheir younger brother, child number 3, is brilliant and has a gift for everything about animals, fish, sharks and all living things. He can also put together 1000 piece puzzles all on his own.

Boy FootballMy fourth born is a natural athlete and has a gift for making friends and accepting everyone. He is well liked by his peers and one of the best defensive tackles on his football team.

20150108_145818My youngest hasn’t broken out of his shell yet.  He loves preschool television shows, art and cars and being the baby of the family. Why am I going into detail about all my children?

Parents need to understand how to encourage their children to use their talents and gifts to become tomorrow’s leaders.  The first step is to teach them how to love themselves. In the book, “Peanut Butter Principles : 47 Leadership Lessons Every Parent Should Teach Their Kids,” author Eric Franklin explains,

“To cultivate our children into inspirational leaders with strong values, we need to be sure they know they are loved – and not just by the people close to them.  They need to realize that they should love themselves, and develop a strong sense of self-worth that becomes the foundation for so many decisions yet to come.”

That statement really hit home for me.  Love is the greatest gift and God‘s number one commandment.

“17 My command to you is to love one another.” John – Chapter 15.

Peanut Butter Principles

In order for us to love one another we must love ourselves first. “Peanut Butter Principles” discusses 47 different lessons we can teach our children so they grow up to be positive, caring, leaders with strong character.  While flipping through the book I found myself nodding my head in agreement for every single lesson. I try my best to raise my kids in a very similar way.

Lesson 20 “Don’t worry about what you don’t know.  Do what you know.”

As parents we should always be learning and we need to encourage our kids to do the same. They will not know everything, but they can learn along the way through experience.  When you or your children learn something new pass on that knowledge to help others. Encourage your kids to ask questions.

I also love how Eric Franklin quotes country music songs. I usually have country radio on in my minivan and you can learn a lot from the lyrics of most of those songs. They are about life, and life lessons.

Lesson 25 “When you are going through hell, keep going.”

That is a lyric taken from a country song by Rodney Atkins. I have felt the lowest of the low in my life, but it is important to pick yourself up and keep going no matter what. In 2008 we lost everything, our home, our vehicles, our jobs, practically our whole lives. I was depressed and miserable. But, I also had three small children at the time and my faith in God. I could have taken the easy route, but I didn’t.  We moved across the country. I got a different job, my husband got a different job and we picked ourselves up and went on with our lives. This is another lesson we must teach our kids. Things will only get better.

Lesson 40 “If what you drive to the bank costs more money than you have in the bank, you’re poor.”

Yup. I think our government officials need to learn this one. We need to be smart with our money and teach our children to do the same.

“There’s nothing wrong with having things,” Franklin writes. “We all have possessions we want, need, or both.  The trouble arises when we put an undue emphasis on the items and the acquiring of these things.  Purchasing becomes a habit that is not driven by rational need, but compulsion and other unhealthy motives.  We lose perspective – and probably waste money.”

He is absolutely correct here. I know this is an area that I still need to work on. I have an Amazon.com wish list several pages long.

Not only do these common sense life lessons benefit our children, as parents we can also learn from them. “Peanut Butter Principles : 47 Leadership Lessons Every Parent Should Teach Their Kids,” by Eric Franklin is the book every parent should have in order to help their children grow into confident, intelligent, and successful adults and leaders who make good choices, build healthy relationships, and cultivate another generation of leaders.

About the author:

Eric Franklin has a passion for empowering people to maximize their abilities and opportunities.  He has started several successful companies in information technology, music and entertainment, management consulting, healthcare, and dining.  He is sought out for his expertise as a business coach and speaker through his “Getting Past Go,” lecture series and is Chairman of the Southern Maryland Workforce Investment Board.

You can purchase “Peanut Butter Principles,” at Amazon.com or anywhere books are sold. For more information visit peanutbutterprinciples.com.

I received a copy of “Peanut Butter Principles : 47 Leadership Lessons Every Parent Should Teach Their Kids,” by Eric Franklin in exchange for this review.  All opinions are accurate and 100% mine.



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