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Jumpstart Your Way into a Healthy New Year

Thanksgiving has come and gone, but the holiday parties and family gatherings are just starting. Even so, you may be looking ahead to the New Year, and you might be vowing to give up sweets, to cook more meals at home, and commit to daily exercise when the ball drops at midnight on January 1st.

Happy New Year

But a cold turkey approach (no pun intended) to resolutions, isn’t always the best way to go about it. Tackling the problem too aggressively with overly restrictive ‘fad diets’ and exercise regimes you can’t commit to will often times leave you feeling deflated. But, it’s never too early or too late to start making lifestyle changes.  For example, during the holiday season, starting a consistent exercise routine, practicing portion control, and activating your social networks to help you stay on track can make a big difference in getting a jump start on your New Year’s resolutions. Listed below are some ways to improve even the most common of bad habits.

New Year

  • Skipping meals. This is a bad habit that rarely helps with weight loss. If you’re too busy, meal replacement shakes are a great way to get the balanced nutrition you need with built in calories and portion control. The Herbalife Nutrition limited edition Formula 1 Trial Size Variety Pack is an easy way to try a variety of delicious flavors, while treating your body to a nutritious and balanced meal in no time!
  • Portion control. If you need help with portion control, start by simply serving yourself less. Using smaller plates or bowls also helps. And keep serving dishes off the table to avoid the temptation to take another helping.
  • Be a smart snacker. When it’s done right, snacking can help you control your overall caloric intake by keeping your hunger in check. A healthy snack combines some carbohydrates with enough protein to satisfy hunger.
  • Staying hydrated. When you don’t drink enough liquids, it can make you tired and irritable which could lead you to unhealthy snacking. Try adding a bit of flavor to your water which will encourage you to drink, and keep a water bottle nearby.
  • Add more fruits and veggies. If you need to add more fruits and veggies to your day, plan to have one at each meal and snack. Frozen fruits and vegetables as just as nutritious as fresh, and you can add fruits to meal replacement shakes, yogurt or cereal, and add veggies to soups, stews, curries, omelets and stir-fries.

For more tips from Susan Bowerman visit www.DiscoverGoodNutrition.com.

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Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training, Herbalife Nutrition

Susan Bowerman is the director of nutrition training at Herbalife Nutrition , where she is responsible for the development of nutrition education and training materials, and is one of the primary authors of the Herbalife sponsored blog, Discover Good Nutrition. She is a registered dietitian, a board certified specialist in sports dietetics and a fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Susan graduated with distinction in biology from the University of Colorado, and received her master’s degree in Food Science and Nutrition from Colorado State University. She then completed her dietetic internship at the University of Kansas. Susan has taught extensively and developed educational programs targeted to individuals, groups and industry in her areas of expertise, including health promotion, weight management and sports nutrition. Prior to her role at Herbalife, she was the assistant director of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition, and has held appointments as adjunct professor in nutrition at Pepperdine University and as lecturer in nutrition in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Susan was a consultant to the (then) Los Angeles Raiders for six seasons, and was a contributing columnist for the Los Angeles Times Health Section for two years. She is a co-author of 23 research papers, 14 book chapters, and was a co-author of two books for the public: “What Color is Your Diet?” and “The L.A. Shape Diet” by Dr. David Heber, published by Harper Collins in 2001 and 2004, respectively.

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